Category Archives: Palcohol

PALCOHOL: Powdered Alcohol

Palcohol labelIn March 2015, the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) approved the use of powdered alcohol in the United States. It appears it will eventually become available in both consumable and non-ingestible industrial forms, but when and where it will be available for purchase is yet unknown. The General Foods Corporation made powdered alcohol as early as the 1970’s by absorbing ethyl alcohol/ethanol into a carbohydrate powder. Many patents exist on the product, but powdered alcohol is still not readily available and some believe that is a good thing.

Turning water into alcohol drinks by just adding powder has generated fear of abuse. Some parents and legislators believe the ease of concealment of powdered alcohol would encourage use among underage drinkers. In spite of liquid alcohol being readily available, some legislators are considering banning the sale of the powdered form. Some states have already banned sale of the product.

Mark Phillips with Lipsmark have recently obtained the TTB’s approval, but authorities are not clear on how to tax the product. Labels have been approved and it appears it will be available soon. Lipsmark, LLC, located in Tempe, AZ, produces six varieties of palcohol including vodka, rum, and four cocktails.

Lipsmark’s products so far include:
“R”- rum, made from cane sugar
“V”- vodka, made from grain
Cosmopolitan cocktail
Mojito
Lemon Drop
Powderita, a margarita-like drink

The Lipsmark website states the reactive legislation is based on misinformation regarding misuse and abuse. Inappropriate use, including snorting the powder is one concern but the company reports it would be difficult to snort, and a very ineffective way to feel alcohol effects. It would take a long time to sniff the equivalent of one shot of vodka up your nose. The powder on mucus membranes generates the harsh burn of alcohol.

In Japan, a powdered product producing a 12% alcohol brandy-like drink is made by Sato Industries. The company released this alcohol drink in 1981. In Germany, a powdered alcohol product sells for about $3 US dollars per drink. The Netherlands also sells a product called Booz2Go.

There are a variety of potential beneficial uses for non-ingestible forms, including: military and industrial applications, medicinal topical use, and a fuel source. Other benefits of the powdered product include its light weight and potential use by back-packers, and for consumption on weight-limited airliners.

The ease of carrying the powder into public events, plus the possibility of covertly spiking the drinks of unsuspecting individuals, generated enough concern for Maryland legislators that they quickly banned the sale of powdered alcohol. Alaska, Delaware, Louisiana, South Carolina and Vermont followed suit.

Failures of Prohibition have not deterred more legislators from considering a ban that could move Palcohol to the black markets. Taxing and controlling its sale would stop that trend. Mark Phillips emphasizes the decisions to ban are based on ignorant speculation. He reminds people of the failure of Prohibition.

We remind people to always drink sensibly and drive sober.

For additional information directly from Phillips’ site consult: http://www.palcohol.com. For additional information from a legal source consult: http://www.bevlaw.com

Betty and Bev

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I’ll Drink to That!

Some water flowing in high mountain streams is pristine enough to drink without the need of additives to kill or filter out disease-causing microbes. But, in many places on planet earth, water clean enough for consumption is in short supply. In California and other drought-ridden locations, plants and animals are dying due to insufficient water. In many areas around the world, dysentery from drinking contaminated water is prevalent and life-threatening.

We take water purity for granted in the US where chlorinated water pours from our taps. But, during much of the past 10,000 years, before the availability of pure water, the only safe liquid to drink contained alcohol. Today, we see alcohol through many lenses, with both good and bad views.

Alcohol is the metabolic byproduct of the natural process of fermentation that occurs when yeasts metabolize sugars. In the Middle Ages, alcohol was called “the water of life,” aqua vitae. They learned to make wine from grapes, and beer from fermented grain. People of all ages, including children, drank alcoholic beverages as their primary consumable liquid. The alcohol destroyed many microbes causing disease and made it safer to drink than water. The processes for making wine and beer are simple. Today, many people make them for fun. Microbreweries have sprung up everywhere. There are many suppliers, even health food stores carry the products.

All alcohols are not consumable. Some can cause blindness and death. Disinfectant alcohol is applied to surfaces of the body prior to medical procedures, and is the primary ingredient in liquid hand purifiers. Windshield cleaners spew various colored fluids containing alcohol. There are many industrial uses.

20150626_195841The drinkable form is ethyl alcohol. It is used in celebratory toasts, paired with elegant dining, and has been shown to contribute to cardiovascular health. Undisciplined drinking carries health risks and tragedy. Alcohol is a sedative drug and a toxin. Excessive consumption contributes to loss of mental function, also causing addiction and liver failure. Alcohol has become a common social drink and a problem for many who drink to excess.

Our next blog will review a new powdered alcohol product called palcohol. Additional blogs will provide information on health and social issues related to alcohol consumption, common early signs of problematic drinking, and will discuss blood alcohol determinations.

Here’s to safe drinking, designated drivers, and moderation in all things.

Betty and Bev