Category Archives: Type 2 Diabetes

5:2 Mediterranean Diet

Your Heart – Prevent & Reverse Heart Disease in Women, Men & Children

The 5:2 Eating Plan

Your Heart Book Cover- Final 1

♥ If you look to the future in defeat and say to yourself there is no way I can lose 20, 30, 50 or 100 pounds. Ask yourself this: Can I cut back my calories one day each week? How about cutting back two days a week?

On the 5/2 Plan you eat about 500 calories one day, then eat a regular healthy Mediterranean cuisine or plant-based cuisine the next one or two days, then you eat only 500 calories the next day, resume regular eating the rest of the week and repeat this ongoing. Your overall calorie intake drops gradually and you lose weight.

In 2012, Dr. Michael J. Mosley shared his concept of eating less than your usual intake for two non-consecutive days a week. With this plan, you reduce your calorie intake significantly but it is not as mentally challenging as setting out to sharply curtail eating for the indefinite future. His concept is to have men eat about 600 calories and women about 500 calories on two non-consecutive low calorie days.

Dr. Mosley’s examples of food choices on the low-intake days are: two eggs and lean meat with water, tea or black coffee; a second meal of grilled fish or meat, with vegetables. Vegetable Tray-1You can make breakfast healthier by throwing out the yolks and eating a side of non-processed protein choices, such as a heap of steamed veggies. (Veggies high in protein include broccoli, mushrooms, soybean sprouts, tomatoes and onions, to name a few.)

Although fasting has been advocated for decades in many groups, harsh diets often fail miserably because metabolic changes related to starvation trigger the body to store up calories and as soon as you begin eating normally, you regain weight.

To be effective and long-lasting, the manner of eating must be sustainable. It must be a way of life — something you can do for the rest of your life. If you have a lot of weight to lose, this would be a life-changing method of gaining control of your eating and reducing Weight control scale and tapeweight. To review: one pound = 3500 calories. If your normal intake is 2500 calories/day and you eat 500 calories two days/week, your weight loss each week would be more than one pound. This is approximately 4-5 pounds per month and 48-60 pounds in a year. In addition, if you choose lower calorie foods, less fat and sugar, you may lose more. Most people find this plan easy to follow for long periods.

Animal studies examining the effects of fasting have shown heart benefit with reducedBlood pressure.2 blood pressure and lower cholesterol levels. Intermittent fasting also lowered diabetes development in lab animals.

Because Dr. Mosley’s unique concept of marked calorie reduction for two out of five days lacked scientific evidence to support the process in reduction of heart disease and diabetes in humans, I was hesitant to include it in this evidence-based book. However, as I was writing this portion of the book a very exciting scientific review in the British Journal of Diabetes and Vascular Disease was published!

An Aston University team in the UK, led by Dr. James E.P. Brown evaluated various approaches to intermittent fasting, looking for any evidence of advantage for its use in treating Type 2 diabetes. In their review, they found intermittent fasting was just as effective, possibly even more effective, than daily calorie restriction and calorie counting. Other favorable findings: markedly low calorie days (not true fasting) can reduce inflammation, reduce both glucose and lipids, and reduce blood pressure.

True fasting lowers metabolic rate and making it harder to burn fat and lose weight. Reduced metabolic rate is protective in a prolonged starvation state and impacts the ability of people today to lose weight. Researchers believe the gene pool of those who were able to survive periods of starvation has been retained in today’s population. Examples are the American Indians and many Polynesian cultures that are experiencing obesity and Type 2 diabetes epidemics.

Their bodies evolved to become efficient in saving calories for harsh times. The problem today is, food is plentiful and the ability to efficiently save the energy in fat stores has become detrimental instead of life-saving.

In the 5/2 plan, eating less on two non-consecutive days is unlikely to lower your metabolic rate and trigger the starvation response. For example, choose Monday women walkingand Thursday as your low calorie days and add daily exercise to your weight loss plan, Exercise is an essential component to health improvement and longer life.

Pregnant women and people with Type 1 diabetes should not fast.

If you are interested in the 5/2 diet, check with your physician and obtain guidance regarding your medications during the low calorie days, especially if you are a Type 2 diabetic taking medications to lower blood glucose. Monitor blood glucose carefully and avoid readings that are too low.

There are many studies showing great benefit by delaying Type 2 diabetes, reversing glucose elevations and reducing insulin resistance with weight loss. Dr. Brown and his team are preparing clinical trials to evaluate the 5/2 dietary format as interventions in various clinical settings.

An excerpt from: Your Heart – Prevent & Reverse Heart Disease in Women, Men & Children

Betty and Bev

Your Heart Book Cover- Final 1

Your Heart

 

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Cardiovascular Disease – Leading Cause of Death related to Childbirth

Heart Disease in Young Women

 Statistics from the state of California confirmed the leading cause of death related to childbirth is cardiovascular disease:

                ♥1/4 of women who died had some form of cardiovascular disease

                ♥2/3 of the deaths were related to cardiomyopathy (heart muscle weakness)

ct-x-heart-pregnancy-0220-em.jpg-20130218Only 6% of these women had been diagnosed with a heart problem prior to pregnancy. (American Heart Association Scientific Session report)

We think of pregnant women as healthy vibrant individuals who do well and have healthy babies. But, pregnancy is a high risk condition for many reasons. Pregnancy places a large cardiovascular load on a woman’s body.

Young women without underlying heart disease are better prepared to tolerate the stress of pregnancy than older women. However many women are now delaying planned pregnancies until an older age when the potential for heart disease has increased.

Lifestyle, including food choices, alcohol consumption, and tobacco use all impact health during pregnancy. Obesity and Type 2 diabetes also increase risk to mother and infant. Cigarette smoking increases risk for sudden infant death and women who smoke are also more likely to suffer sudden death.

Two conditions often seen with pregnancy are: high blood pressure (pre-eclampsia) and diabetes (gestational diabetes). Both require careful monitoring and treatment Women with these problems during pregnancy are more likely to develop high blood pressure, diabetes and cardiovascular disease later in life.

Being overweight and pregnant places both mother and child at risk for cardiovascular disease and complications during delivery, including C-sections and anesthesia-related problems. Overweight pregnant women are more likely to have stillbirths, deliver prematurely and may have large infants making delivery difficult. Large babies are more likely to become obese in childhood.

Additional statistics: (From The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists)

  • Over one-third of women living in the US are obese
  • More than one-half of pregnant women are overweight or obese
  • 8% of reproductive-age women are extremely obese & at high risk for pregnancy complications

Guidelines for pregnancy weight gain are calculated based on the woman’s pre-pregnant BMI (Body Mass Index). Details are available on the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists website: www.acog.org  Search “Weight Gain During Pregnancy.”

 General guideline:

·         1.1 – 4.4 pounds in the first three months

·         1 pound/week during the last six months

·         The average total weight gain over all BMI ranges =  30 pounds

·         Low weight women: over 30 pounds may be acceptable

·         Obese women: gain only 11-20 pounds during the entire pregnancy

Nutrition counseling at all weights is very important to assure proper food choices and nutrition during pregnancy.

Before becoming pregnant, healthy choices, an active lifestyle (including daily exercise) and weight control are all important. Seek a full medical evaluation including laboratory studies before becoming pregnant. An exercise program and nutrition counseling will benefit mother and infant.

 

LINKS TO LIVING LONGER

DON’T WAIT–DROP THE WEIGHT

Coronary artery disease (CAD) kills more men and women than any other disease including cancer. Being overweight increases your chance of heart attack. With 68% of adults in the US now being overweight or obese, weight loss is key in reducing heart disease and sudden death risks. Reduce your risk for dying from this silently progressive disease by taking control of your life. The most important step to reduce your risks for Type 2 diabetes and heart disease is to obtain a normal weight. Weight loss is difficult, possibly more difficult than quitting smoking, but if you do smoke, it is killing you. You need to stop. Smoking is the number one risk for heart disease. To reduce your weight, you can’t  just stop eating. Instead, you must make choices, change your eating habits and begin following a path to health.

This is the first LINK TO LIVING LONGER blog. Regular postings will follow. Many will be excerpts from our book Your Heart that will be available this month. Your Heart is a handbook for heart health and the road to longevity. All of the information is science-based. No gimmicks. All the facts are there, from normal heart function to what happens at the cellular level when cholesterol starts clogging your arteries.

We won’t try to turn you into doctors, but all the facts will be there to help you make informed decisions related to your health and the health of your family. You will be able to understand cholesterol, dietary fats, sugar, high fructose sugar and how obesity is killing us. The book is not a diet book but does provide factual information on food choices.

You may want to try the “5:2” diet popularized by Dr. Michael J. Mosley. See the link below. In the 5:2 diet, you eat normally for five days, then you eat only 500 calories for 2 days.  Many people are finding this “intermittent fasting” diet a way to jump-start their weight loss program. You might call it a gimmick, but it is a way for you to begin losing weight while  learning to change what you eat. If you are diabetic, you should do this only under the care of your physician. However, as a Type 2 diabetic, weight loss does reduce insulin resistance and may actually get you off your medications. Weight loss also lowers blood pressure and reduces your risk of cardiovascular disease, heart attacks and stroke.

On the days your calorie intake is down, your body will thank you. Soon, you will be patting yourself on the back. Feeling better and lowering heart risks is your present to yourself. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/5:2_diet

Betty Kuffel, MD