Category Archives: COVID-19

COVID-19 LOGIC

MASK UP

COVID-19 deaths in the past year approach half a million, surpassing heart disease as the highest annual cause of death in the U. S. These killer diseases are markedly different.

Coronary heart disease evolves over years of bad lifestyle choices and underlying inherited disorders. You can get COVID-19 and possibly die by not wearing a mask and simply standing near a SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus-infected person. This highly contagious acute respiratory disease is airborne, and the virus spreads easily from person to person. Choices made throughout a lifetime help prevent coronary heart disease, but simple actions taken right now can prevent COVID-19 and save lives.

The viral disease may be mild, but perfectly healthy people, young and old, have died from it. Increased age and younger citizens with pre-existing diseases, including obesity, diabetes, heart disease asthma and any immune suppression have increased risk of serious COVID-19 illness and death. These factors increase the need for hospital care, oxygen support, and make the risk of death higher.

PREVENTION IS BEST

FOLLOW THESE CDC GUIDELINES TO DECREASE RISKS FOR COVID-19:

AVOID CROWDS.

WEAR A MASK IN PUBLIC.

STAY AT LEAST SIX FEET APART.

AVOID TOUCHING YOUR FACE AND NOSE.

WASH YOUR HANDS & USE SANITIZER FREQUENTLY.

GET YOUR VACCINATION AS SOON AS YOU ARE ELIGIBLE.

CONTINUE TO WEAR A MASK IN PUBLIC EVEN AFTER BEING VACCINATED.

MASK GUIDELINES

Wearing a mask does not mean pulling a bandana or neck gaiter up over your mouth or walking around with a mask only covering your mouth. To be effective, masks must cover both the nose and mouth, fit against your cheeks, and be secured beneath your chin. You must breathe through the fabric without gaps along your cheeks.

Recommended masks: disposable surgical, 2-ply cotton fabric masks, N95, NK95.

Most effective protection is to wear a fabric mask over one of the other selections.

(N95 masks are still in short supply and must be preserved for frontline workers.)

Avoid being near anyone who is not complying with these practices.

Watch for updates from CDC.

LipstickLogic.com

Betty and Bev

COVID AND YOUR HEART

February is Heart Health Month

 

Each year the American Heart Association designates February as Heart Health Month to raise awareness and encourage health style changes to lower risks. Heart disease caused by narrowed coronary arteries has been the major cause of death in both women and men around the world for decades. This year, rising Covid-19 deaths will skew statistics and within this high death rate are many who have underlying coronary artery disease.

Covid-19 typically impacts the respiratory system but may progress to other body parts including the heart. Older people who developed heart disease over a lifetime are at increased risk when infected with the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus that causes COVID-19 illness. But the virus can also attack young healthy hearts.

Some survivors with no underlying heart disease who did not require hospitalization still developed heart complications. Heart muscle inflammation (myocarditis) and heart failure (decreased pumping ability) occur in some. Heart failure results in shortness of breath, ankle swelling and decreased exercise tolerance.

A Mount Sinai Health Systems study of 3,000 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 showed a high number with heart injury. Thirty-six percent showed elevated troponin levels indicating heart muscle damage. Rising blood troponin correlated with a higher risk of death. Even patients with mild heart muscle injury had a 75% higher risk of death than those with normal troponin levels.

Most people who test positive for COVID-19 experience mild symptoms, require no hospitalization, and experience a full recovery. Systemic effects from the infection are variable but include blood clotting disorders and nervous system involvement. An overwhelming immune response, called a “cytokine storm” results in cellular damage and shock in some patients. But many older people with chronic diseases such as diabetes, kidney and lung problems have complicated courses. Reduced oxygenation that can be severe may evolve to irreversible lung damage.

Post COVID weakness and exhaustion require a cardiac workup. It is important to seek medical attention for chest pressure, shortness of breath, and palpitations (irregular heartbeat). If your heart rate is abnormally slow, fast, or irregular, make an appointment to see your doctor.

 

The workup will involve the following: a history of your symptoms, underlying risks such as diabetes, high blood pressure, known heart disease, medication list, and activity level prior to COVID-19 infection. Common evaluations include physical exam, chest X-ray, ECG, and an echocardiogram.

Contact the American Heart Association for general heart health guidance and follow CDC recommendations for protection during the pandemic. For personal safety and the safety of others, masks and social distancing are essential. Consult your healthcare provider or local health department to register for a vaccination as soon as possible. Follow safety precautions and always wear a mask when you leave your home.

Lower stress with education. Know your risks and take action.

American Heart Association

CDC COVID information

Save lives and protect your heart.

Lipstick Logic Sisters Betty and Bev

 Amazon link

Stay Healthy, Stay Home

Uncertain Times

Since the writing of our last blog, most everyone’s daily life patterns and concerns, including ours, have changed dramatically.

Honestly, we have been so preoccupied trying to keep up on the latest Covid-19 news, we haven’t felt like writing, but we want to encourage you to do everything you can to stop the spread of Covid-19.

We personally have abided by our governors’ Stay Home mandates and the CDC’s guidelines and have encouraged our family members and friends to do the same.

Staying home can seem restrictive, and yet, from everything we read and hear from reliable medical sources, social distancing is one of the easiest and most effective measures we can take to do our part to stop the spread of this pandemic virus. We have tried to use our Stay Home time creatively.

In fact, we have engaged in some amazing acts of cleaning – like sorting through 30 years of old papers and documents. And, after three weeks of confinement, our closets, floors and kitchen cabinets have never looked better. Cleaning is what we do best when we feel stressed. Engage in activities around your home you have put off due to a lack of time. Time is one thing you have right now, consider it a gift. Create, clean, wash the windows, read something other than the news.

We encourage you to focus on activities you like to do, but also practice acts of kindness wherever you can both within your family and toward others, including your pets who feel your anxiety. Take daily walks but remember to wear masks whenever you are away from home. Stay connected with family and friends through phone calls, texting, Instagram photos, Facebook and online face-time visits. Reach out to others, especially those confined at home alone with no spouse, significant other or children to help occupy their time. Write a letter to someone you know who is confined to a nursing home.

Using online services to order your groceries with curbside pick-up is an excellent way to practice social distancing. If you don’t have online grocery ordering options, be sure to wear a face mask to protect yourself and the safety of front-line grocery staff who are still working to stock shelves and serve customers.

No one is working harder right now that the medical community. We want to thank every doctor, nurse, and healthcare provider from the bottom of our hearts for their dedication in helping those who need their care and expertise. This is a painful situation facing not only the United States but the world.

The outcome depends on each of us to do our part.

Electronic hugs to you.

Betty and Bev

A photo taken before the days of social distancing.