Category Archives: Heart Disease in Men

PROTECT YOUR HEART

Fewer people are dying from heart attacks. Education, healthy changes in lifestyle and diet have made Two Red Heartsdramatic improvements. Additional life-saving interventions include rapid treatments to open closing vessels interrupting heart attacks. Dilation and placement of stents open a closing vessel and returns blood flow to the heart muscle before damage occurs. We have made strides in reducing heart deaths in recent years, but cardiovascular disease remains the number one killer of both men and women.

The key to heart health is early action to alter contributing factors. If you recognize worrisome chests symptoms seek healthcare immediately. Call 9-1-1.

Take control of your health through education and action. Basic actions:

  • Exercise – Thirty minutes of exercise a day contributes to improved health
  • Eat Right – Cut calories by reducing fat, sugar and portion sizes
  • Drink – Water, coffee or tea. Stop drinking diet and sugared sodas.
  • Read – Learn how to improve your health and take control
  • Visit a health practitioner: Know your numbers for blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose

National Wear Red Day is Friday February 3, 2017

The American Heart Association started the Go Red for Women national movement to improve education helping women learn their risks and take action. I wrote Your Heart- Prevent & Reverse Heart Disease in Women, Men and Children to provide a concise reference with broad information on heart health, diet, exercise with details to take action. Heart disease the #1 killer of women causes 1:3 deaths each year.

Your Heart – Prevent & Reverse Heart Disease in Women, Men & Children

Your Heart Book Cover- Final FINAL

Your Heart Book on Amazon

Price reduction: Kindle $2.99, Paperback $9.99

https://www.goredforwomen.org/

https://yourheartbook.com

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LOVE YOUR HEART

Two Red Hearts

Your Heart – Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease in Women, Men and Children

Kindle e-book $2.99   http://tinyurl.com/kindle-heart-sale          

Paperback $9.99  https://www.createspace.com/4330606

For the entire month of February, Your Heart is offered at sale rates.

American Heart Month is a perfect time to raise awareness and explore reversible risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Know your health history and address factors that can be modified to improve heart health:

♥ Tobacco use and cessation

♥ High blood pressure identification and treatment

♥ Cholesterol abnormalities paired with dietary modification and statin use when needed

♥ Obesity and diabetes with recommendations for normalizing weight and glucose

♥ Low activity levels counteracted with exercise prescriptions

♥ Alcohol consumption history and limitation of use

♥ Heredity factors and recommended interventions

Heart risk factors are within your ability to control. Make this the month you evaluate your personal risks and take action to reduce them. With the right knowledge and actions, the number one cause of death in women and men is preventable.

Book Excerpt:

Why is coronary artery disease the leading cause of death?

Atherosclerosis is a disease of affluence. In developed countries throughout the world where food is plentiful, coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death. We eat, not only because we feel hungry, we eat to pass time, we eat for enjoyment, and we munch mindlessly at social events. The fact is, we eat too much and it’s making us sick.

Coronary artery disease is tied to obesity. Food choices, portion sizes and exercise interplay, but the disease is more complex than any of these factors.

Statistics are boring to read and don’t mean much when they are without a face. But consider the fact that 50% of all people have high blood pressure, high cholesterol or smoke; all three factors cause heart disease. Many of us personally know someone with these problems. Is it you? A loved one? You have the ability to make healthy choices and improve your health by treating these factors.

Part of the high death rate from heart disease is due to a lack of education about the cause and what can be done to fight it. But even knowing sound health practices, many people do not follow them. In recent years, there has been a reduction in heart deaths through improved treatment, education and reduction of risk factors, but coronary artery disease still remains the leading cause of death.

Two programs to address education, diagnosis and treatment are: the Million Hearts initiative, developed by the Department of Health and Human Services, with a goal to prevent a million heart attacks and strokes by 2017; and the WISEWOMAN program, administered through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Heart disease is a huge problem in developed countries around the world, including the United States. The Million Hearts program joined with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Heart Association and other organizations. Together they share strategies to reduce heart risk factors and save lives. Information from these organizations is available for education programs to implement change.

At 21 US sites, the WISEWOMAN project provides a screening and evaluation program to help women obtain healthcare when they have little or no insurance. Examinations, laboratory tests and education to lower risks are included.

Diabetes, overweight, poor diet choices, low physical activity and excess alcohol are all issues placing people at risk. If any of these affect you, take control, read more, learn more and make heart healthy changes. Don’t become a statistic. Take action. Choose to reduce your personal risk factors.

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 50% of men and 64% of women who die suddenly of coronary heart disease have no previous symptoms. Even if you have no symptoms, you may still be at risk for heart disease.

Katie, a registered nurse who believed she was healthy, working full time in a hospital but having difficulty with an arthritic knee finally decided to see an orthopedist. He recommended a total knee replacement procedure. As part of her preoperative evaluation, her primary physician evaluated her and performed an electrocardiogram. The electrical tracing of her heart conduction and rhythm was abnormal, indicating ischemia. A special nuclear medicine test of her heart showed marked reduction of circulation in the heart muscle. Katie went directly to the heart cath lab where two main coronary arteries were found to be more than 90% blocked by cholesterol plaques. The cardiologist dilated and stented both arteries. The orthopedic surgery had to be placed on hold. — Katie denies ever having any symptoms related to her heart.

Many people are aware that high cholesterol is associated with heart attacks, yet have never had a cholesterol blood test done. Because they have no symptoms, they can’t believe they might be a candidate for a heart attack. The more you know how lifestyle, food choices and heredity factors impact heart health, the more equipped you will be to make healthy choices and obtain proper healthcare. This section provides more information on risk factors.

 Thanks for stopping by. We hope 2014 will be a healthy and happy year for you.

Betty and Bev

CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS INCREASE HEART RISK

 RETHINKING CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS

TAutumn Floral Hearthe British Medical Journal published an important research study online in February 2013. Involving over 60,000 Swedish women, following their mammograms and health over 19 years, researchers found 32% of deaths were from cardiovascular disease with half being from coronary artery disease and the rest from strokes. When diet and supplemental calcium were assessed, they found increased calcium, above 1,400 milligrams per day, was associated with almost a doubling of death from coronary artery disease.

 Calcium supplements combined with high calcium in the diet increased the risk.

 This is not the first report regarding calcium supplements and increased risk of heart attacks. A recent report in JAMA Intern Med 2012, in a 12 year follow-up of nearly 400,000 men and women, showed increased risk of heart disease death in men (but not women) who took 1000 mg of calcium supplements. In the June 1012 issue of Heart; (98:920-925), researchers found dietary intake with calcium supplements increased overall cardiovascular mortality. In 2010, another BMJ article showed calcium supplements without vitamin D supplements increased the risk of heart attack.

The US Preventive Services Task Force consists of a group of experts in preventive healthcare. Their recommendations published February 2012 in the Annals of Internal Medicine stated the following:

  • In men and women without osteoporosis or vitamin D deficiency, it is unclear whether they should take vitamin D and calcium supplements to prevent fractures.
  • It is unclear whether postmenopausal women should take daily supplements of more than 1000 mg of calcium.
  • They also report, daily supplements of 400 IU of vitamin D and 1000 mg of calcium has no effect on the incidence of fractures in postmenopausal women

So, why are so many women taking vitamin D and calcium supplements if calcium supplements do not translate to betterXray pelvis health and fewer fractures? -And, when many studies are actually showing evidence of adverse cardiovascular effects associated with increased calcium intake? The debate on the topic of calcium supplements is ongoing, but at this time, calcium supplements are no longer broadly encouraged, unless based on unique health decisions between patient and physician.

The safest approach to this conundrum is to consult your physician, site these articles and, unless you have osteoporosis, discuss stopping calcium supplements and obtaining your calcium from foods in your diet. Dietary calcium is found in broccoli, green leafy vegetables, fortified soy milk, tofu and baked beans. Tofu, bean cake made from soy, is high in calcium. One-half cup of tofu made with calcium sulfate = 434 milligrams.

Elements of strong bones include: calcium, protein, phosphorous, magnesium, vitamin D and potassium. For years we have consumed large amounts of milk, sometimes called “liquid meat.” Cow’s milk is nutritious containing proteins, vitamin D, phosphorous and calcium.  All are needed for strong bones.  Milk also contains undesirable saturated fat and calories. Drink less milk and eat more calcium rich foods to obtain your daily calcium dietary requirements.

Vitamin D and Heart Attack: New research from the University of Copenhagen shows increased risk of heart attack and death with low levels of vitamin D. And, Vitamin D deficiency may increase blood pressure. There is no proven cause between low D and heart risk, but this correlation requires more study. The study, published in the Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology journal, evaluated 10,000 Danes in the Copenhagen City Heart Study..

Exercise and vitamins are very important for bone health. In fact, bone strength is primarily generated during the teenage years and maintained throughout life with weight bearing exercise such as walking and a healthy diet containing about 1000 mg of calcium. Eating a healthy diet rich in calcium and vitamin D is important to long-term bone and heart health.

Talk to your medical professional about the appropriate way to meet your calcium and vitamin D needs. Ask for a vitamin D level to see if you need to eat more D foods or take a supplement. Another way to get vitamin D is through limited sun exposure on your skin to allow your body to generate vitamin D. Those who live in northern climates are often vitamin D deficient because they lack sun exposure. Sunblock, important to protect against sun damage and melanoma, limits natural vitamin D conversion and contributes to vitamin D deficiency.

In the meantime, eat a diet containing the nutrients you need. Walk more to increase bone density. Exercise correlates with longer life and better health, too.

Just as recommendations related to hormone replacement after menopause changed in the past,  science-based recommendations in the area of calcium supplements are changing. What we thought was the solution to maintaining bone density may be adding serious health risks. Studies on bone health are ongoing, so watch the media for additional information. Because so many women have reduced bone density and are on calcium supplements, these studies are very important. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death in both men and women. Calcium supplements are so commonly consumed, this may be a factor contributing to the high incidence of heart disease.

This is one of the many topics covered in our book, available later this month: Your Heart: Preventing and Reversing Heart Disease in Women, Men and Children.

Betty Kuffel, MD

LINKS TO LIVING LONGER

DON’T WAIT–DROP THE WEIGHT

Coronary artery disease (CAD) kills more men and women than any other disease including cancer. Being overweight increases your chance of heart attack. With 68% of adults in the US now being overweight or obese, weight loss is key in reducing heart disease and sudden death risks. Reduce your risk for dying from this silently progressive disease by taking control of your life. The most important step to reduce your risks for Type 2 diabetes and heart disease is to obtain a normal weight. Weight loss is difficult, possibly more difficult than quitting smoking, but if you do smoke, it is killing you. You need to stop. Smoking is the number one risk for heart disease. To reduce your weight, you can’t  just stop eating. Instead, you must make choices, change your eating habits and begin following a path to health.

This is the first LINK TO LIVING LONGER blog. Regular postings will follow. Many will be excerpts from our book Your Heart that will be available this month. Your Heart is a handbook for heart health and the road to longevity. All of the information is science-based. No gimmicks. All the facts are there, from normal heart function to what happens at the cellular level when cholesterol starts clogging your arteries.

We won’t try to turn you into doctors, but all the facts will be there to help you make informed decisions related to your health and the health of your family. You will be able to understand cholesterol, dietary fats, sugar, high fructose sugar and how obesity is killing us. The book is not a diet book but does provide factual information on food choices.

You may want to try the “5:2” diet popularized by Dr. Michael J. Mosley. See the link below. In the 5:2 diet, you eat normally for five days, then you eat only 500 calories for 2 days.  Many people are finding this “intermittent fasting” diet a way to jump-start their weight loss program. You might call it a gimmick, but it is a way for you to begin losing weight while  learning to change what you eat. If you are diabetic, you should do this only under the care of your physician. However, as a Type 2 diabetic, weight loss does reduce insulin resistance and may actually get you off your medications. Weight loss also lowers blood pressure and reduces your risk of cardiovascular disease, heart attacks and stroke.

On the days your calorie intake is down, your body will thank you. Soon, you will be patting yourself on the back. Feeling better and lowering heart risks is your present to yourself. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/5:2_diet

Betty Kuffel, MD