Tag Archives: Healthy choices

♥ Protect Your Heart ♥

February is American Heart Month

Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of women and men. February is a great time to review your health history and explore actions to reduce risks for dying of heart disease and stroke. Heart risk factors and actions:

♥ Tobacco use and cessation

♥ High blood pressure identification and treatment

♥ Cholesterol abnormalities paired with dietary modification and statin use when needed

♥ Low activity levels counteracted with exercise prescriptions

♥ Alcohol consumption history and limitation of use

♥ Heredity factors and recommended interventions

To help you take control and make 2018 a healthier year, we are offering our book free on February 13, 14 & 15. In just two-hundred pages, Your Heart will give you the science behind the disease, some actions to improve your health and common interventions that could save your life or the life of a loved one. This includes information on the Mediterranean 5/2 diet, a safe and easy way to reduce weight and maintain a healthy weight for life.


Prevent & Reverse Heart Disease in Women Men & Children

♥ FREE FEBRUARY 13, 14 & 15♥ 




Healthy Lifestyle – 2015


Lifestyle means different things to different people. In the past, a healthy lifestyle for hardworking farmers meant getting up before dawn to first milk cows before spending a long day of heavy labor in the fields. A breakfast of fried pork chops and eggs accompanied by homemade bread slathered with butter commonly provided the first meal of the day. A hard working man needed those heavy calories for energy to perform his daily job.

Scan old photos and it’s unlikely you’ll find a fat farmer. They ate food laden with fat and calories but they worked it off. They earned their calories. My grandfather was a farmer. I saw what he ate. My family enjoyed amazing meals, especially during threshing when friends helped friends and families helped families. Eating well was their way of life. For most of us it’s the same today—except now, many people don’t earn their calories.

The body is an efficient metabolic machine. When you eat more calories than you burn your body stores the excess as fat. So lifestyle today is different from the lifestyle of the past, and practices of the past are unhealthy today.

Exercise is the single most important activity that correlates with a long and healthy life. A close second are: your food choices and the volume of food you eat. We need to eat to live, not live to eat.

A new twenty year-long study of 70,000 women confirmed a healthy lifestyle could prevent 75% of heart attacks in young women. Death rates from heart disease in the US have slowly dropped over the past four decades, but in women ages 35-44, this is not true. The study published in the American College of Cardiology reported health habits make the difference. Women with unhealthy lifestyle choices began showing increased heart risks by age 47.

Below are seven top ways to improve your lifestyle and reduce risks for heart disease:

• Don’t smoke
• Consume a maximum of one alcoholic drink/day
• Maintain a normal body mass index (BMI)
• Watch seven or fewer hours of TV per week
• Exercise at least 2.5 hours per week (35 minutes per day)
• Eat a quality diet based on Harvard’s School of Public Health healthy eating plate.
• Have an annual physical that includes a lipid panel

Smoking: Quit. Ask your doctor for assistance if you can’t do it on your own.
Alcohol: Wine: 5 ounces, Liquor: 1.5 ounces, Beer: 12 ounces
Plate and portions: Healthy Eating
BMI: At the link below you’ll find health information and a BMI calculator to check your current BMI. For the calculation you need to know your weight in pounds and height.

Make 2015 a healthy year for you and your family. Monitor your blood pressure, address your weight, add exercise every day and encourage others to do the same.

Betty Kuffel, MD and Bev Erickson

Lipstick Logic (TM)


Go Red for Women – Wear Red on February 7th

wb051305In 2003, the American Heart Association began National Wear Red Day®. With so many women dying each year from heart disease, this movement was formed to bring attention to the problem. Their goal was to educate women and reduce this statistic.

 For the past ten years, each February, the Go Red for Women events have raised awareness and helped women make strides against heart disease. Fewer women are dying from coronary artery disease now, but it still remains the number one threat.

 In support of women’s heart health, Lipstick Logic is providing free excerpts and a sale on our book for the month of February.

 This is a perfect gift for yourself and those you love.

Your Heart – Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease in Women, Men and Children

Kindle e-book $2.99   http://tinyurl.com/kindle-heart-sale          

Paperback $9.99  https://www.createspace.com/4330606

  Your Heart Book Cover- Final FINAL

 Chapter 5

Female Heart Disease

Women and Heart Disease

Many women do not realize they are at high risk for heart disease and early death. Under age 50, heart attacks in women are twice as likely to be fatal as in men. Each year more than 250,000 women die of heart attacks. Six times the number of women die from heart disease than from breast cancer. Many factors weigh into these statistics including hormones.

♥ Research reported in the National Institutes of Health bulletin, The Heart Truth for Women, states that by leading a healthy lifestyle, women can lower risks by 82%. You are in charge. This means: regular exercise, healthy weight and not smoking. Also take medications to control other risk factors such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol. What you choose to do and what you eat can improve health and prolong life.

Coronary Microvascular Disease

Early in life, male and female hearts look alike and act the same. With aging, gender differences in disease processes become apparent and contribute to misdiagnosis in women. Men typically develop arterial heart disease that narrows large coronary arteries on the heart surface. Women have the same type of large vessel disease as men, but are also prone to coronary microvascular disease — a problem involving the small vessels called arterioles.

Possibly triggered by inflammatory disorders, coronary arterioles in women become stiff and unable to supply adequate oxygen to the heart muscle. Chest discomfort and other symptoms more subtle are often associated with increased activity. Microvascular disease increases your risk for heart attack and sudden death.

A number of health problems cause inflammation including high blood glucose, smoking and chronic infection that also affect men. Additional factors in women are: poorly controlled premenopausal hypertension, anemia and autoimmune disorders*. All of these problems may contribute to developing coronary microvascular disease. However, the cause of this disease is unknown. The Women’s Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation study (the WISE study) provided extensive information for the disorder. Some researchers believe estrogen reduction is a related. Anyone can develop coronary microvascular disease, but inflammatory disorders appear to be a prominent factor and they are more common in women.

Special tests are required to diagnose coronary microvascular disease. Advanced disease may be present, placing the person at risk, yet a coronary angiogram — the best diagnostic evaluation for large coronary arteries — can be normal. If the clinical suspicion for heart disease is high and the angiogram is normal, a “Stress-Echo” is usually recommended to evaluate for microvascular disease.

Coronary microvascular disease cannot be treated with stents or a bypass, but medications and lifestyle changes are beneficial and life-prolonging. Treatment is similar to that used in large vessel coronary disease:

● Statins to lower cholesterol

● Low dose aspirin to inhibit platelets

● Nitroglycerine to relax and dilate arterioles to improve blood flow and treat chest discomfort

● ACE inhibitors to lower blood pressure

● Beta blockers to lower heart rate and reduce heart stress

● Heart healthy diet, daily exercise, no smoking, weight loss

Note: Autoimmune diseases occur when the body produces harmful antibodies against itself. Examples: Lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, multiple sclerosis, some thyroid diseases and many others.

More life-saving information like this can be found in Your Heart: Prevent & Reverse Heart Disease in Women, Men & Children

Thanks for stopping by.

Betty Kuffel, MD

Bev Erickson Co-author/Artist/Cover art



Your Heart: Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease will be available this month. We are in the final editing process. To give you an early start on some of the book’s content, Lipstick Logic will be posting excerpts. Based on the latest evidence-based research, you will have the information and power to make changes to improve your heart health. 

Front Page - Kindle- 6x9Your Heart is a handbook on heart disease. Coronary artery disease is preventable. Caused by narrowed heart arteries it kills more men and women than any other disease including cancer. Because one-in-four women die of heart disease and two-thirds of them have no recognized symptoms, learning the information in this book may be life-saving.

The heart is the only muscle that never rests. You sleep, but your heart doesn’t. Its built-in nervous system electrically drives this biological engine every minute of your life. Your heart’s neurological pacemaker fires off an electrical impulse signaling the heart muscle to contract. As the muscle contracts, the chamber inside the heart becomes smaller. As the chamber reduces in size, it pushes blood through the aortic valve into the aorta and through the rest of the body.

The coronary arteries run on the surface of the heart and with each contraction, blood surges into them to supply the heart muscle with nutrients and oxygen. With each beat about 70 ml (2+ounces) of blood exit the heart. If your heart rate is 70 beats per minute, add it up—your heart circulates approximately 5 quarts of blood each minute. Without this mandatory oxygen distribution to the body life ends.

Along with transporting red blood cells that carry oxygen to all organs, the blood carries many other cells, proteins and factors needed to sustain life. This red super-highway carries wonderful nutrients to feed your cells. Swirling throughout the body are cells that fight infection, promote clotting and support life functions. The blood also carries factors, that in excess, cause heart disease and early death.

In developed countries throughout the world coronary artery disease (CAD) is the primary cause of death. It is a disease of affluence. We eat not only because we feel hungry, we eat for enjoyment, to pass time, and at social events we munch mindlessly. The fact is, we eat too much and it’s making us sick.

Coronary artery disease, the leading cause of death in both men and women, is tied to obesity. Your food choices, portion sizes and exercise interplay, but CAD is more complex than these factors alone.

Understanding the anatomy, physiology and dynamics of heart function in health and disease, and actions both men and women can take to reduce related risk factors are provided in the book. The latest research information makes this book a up-to-date valuable reference and includes diagnosis, treatment details and dietary recommendations.

Betty Kuffel, MD



Taking Control of Your Health

You know the feeling – the sinking, shocking feeling –  when you hear the news a good friend has just died of a heart attack. In disbelief, you think – it can’t be. She/he was so young – maybe even a year or two younger than you. Then you begin to consider all the issues that might have contributed: he did smoke; she had a stressful job; she was overweight. All of these are risk factors that lead to coronary heart disease and sudden cardiac deaths.

Do you have stress in your life? Is your blood pressure under control? Are you overweight? Do you exercise regularly? Do you know your numbers – your blood pressure, cholesterol and triglyceride numbers? You need to know them.

Don’t let a heart attack happen to you. Learn to recognize the symptoms. Learn what you can do to prevent and reverse heart disease. Take control of your life.

Many sudden death heart attacks are preventable; heart disease is preventable. With proper interventions, arterial narrowing in heart arteries can be reversed.

Lipstick Logic is about to publish an up-to-date book on the links to cardiovascular disease and what you can do, right now–today–to start changing your habits and improve your chances of living longer and healthier.

This book called, Your Heart, will provide you with a complete and thorough understanding of how your heart works and what it needs to work well —and what causes it to malfunction. If you take the time to learn this critical information now, you could make changes that will save your life.

Your heart is the only muscle in your body that never stops working, until it stops, dead.

You have the ability to make important choices in your diet, your lifestyle and exercise regimen right now to decrease your risk of progressive artery narrowing. The book details how your food choices can clog your arteries and cause a stroke or heart attack. Don’t wait until a heart attack to make changes – learn what you can do now to prolong your life.

Just as it is for men, heart attacks are the number one killer of women. More woman die annually of heart attacks than breast cancer.

With Your Heart, you’ll have an opportunity to read a comprehensive heart book written for women by Betty Kuffel, MD, a doctor of Internal Medicine. Dr. Kuffel has spent much of her professional life in emergency departments where she saw far too many women arrive by ambulance in cardiac arrest.  Many times these women had not recognized their heart symptoms and had not consulted a physician. Had they known what this book can teach you, they might be alive today.  Although the book was written with women in mind, except for some heart diseases specific to females, most of the information also pertains to men.

With years of medical education, experience treating both men and women, studying and staying current on heart research and interventions, Dr. Kuffel is the ideal, highly qualified person to share this information. And importantly, she has dedicated her professional life to helping women improve their health.

Your Heart will become your “go-to” book for everything you want to know about your what makes your heart work well and what you can do to improve heart function to extend your life. This book includes the unique aspects of heart disease in women. Goals for blood pressure, cholesterol levels, food choices, exercise, and what you need to discuss with your doctor are all specified in this book.

Watch for blog up-dates and publication date of YOUR HEART.

Bev Erickson, Lipstick Logic Co-founder

Helping Your Heart and Your Memory

Resveratrol: Its Beneficial Effects

Would you like to make a simple healthful change to benefit your heart? Resveratrol elevates HDL levels, the good cholesterol. Having a high HDL doesn’t mean you are protected against developing heart disease, but those with high HDLs appear to have reduced risk for coronary artery disease. Two human studies have also shown resveratrol can boost insulin activity in Type II diabetics and reduce harmful blood vessel disease leading to diabetic blindness. Another effect is the reduction in fat cell production of inflammatory compounds that contribute to heart disease and tissue damage associated with diabetes.

This natural product, obtainable in most pharmacies and health food stores, stimulates a family of sirtuin proteins in the body that are gene regulators. Metabolic and biological aging processes are affected by sirtuins, especially the protein SIRT1. Researchers at Howard Hughes Medical Institute found SIRT1 plays a roll in decreasing aging and aids learning and memory. Most of us could benefit from that!

Another protein resveratrol stimulates is CREB, which  strengthens connections between neurons. The CREB activity is increased by SIRT1.  There won’t be an SIRT1 pill coming soon, but understanding this relationship shows promise in understanding and reversing degenerative processes causing memory loss. Resveratrol in your diet may help your memory.

Diets rich in resveratrol protect the heart, increase fat burning and reduce weight gain—and in mice, extend lifespan. The compound is found in grapes, grape products, wine, peanuts and some plants. A trade product containing resveratrol called Reversitol comes in both pill and liquid forms. It tastes like grape juice and is easily tolerated as a food supplement.

Betty Kuffel, MD