Tag Archives: Brain Health

Alcohol, Women and the Economy

Alcohol abuse has ruined many lives and relationships. There are few families without these problems. Child abuse, partner abuse and self-abuse are all intertwined when it comes to the use of mind-changing substances. Some people are successful occasional users, many are not.

Recent research articles and experiences with alcoholic friends stimulated this series of blogs on the topic. This will be our last one for now, but I wanted to end with recent information on the topic to help you analyze your own behavior and possibly intervene when you see dangerous behavior occurring.
Microbreweries and small distilleries have become popular everywhere. Tasting a “flight” of either beer or hard liquor samples may put you over the safe driving blood alcohol limit of .08. A designated driver is essential. One in ten deaths among working-age Americans between the ages of 20-64 is caused by excessive alcohol. Drunk driving kills.

Two days ago, a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a study showing alcohol consumption and costs have accelerated. The economic costs are due to reduced work productivity, the cost of treating people for health problems related to alcohol, and crime. These statistics did not examine the pain and suffering from alcoholic behaviors.
We all understand why pregnant women must be wary of alcohol and its harm to an unborn child. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, also called Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is a constant reminder that mental and physical changes are attributable to a mother’s behavior while pregnant. There is no amount of alcohol consumed while pregnant that has been proven safe. The primary concern is that small amounts of alcohol could negatively affect the developing fetal brain. Each woman has to decide. Our advice to pregnant women is to wait and have a glass champagne to celebrate after the birth of your child.

Many have a glass of wine for social reasons. Others drink to get drunk, or are addicted and don’t stop until their blood alcohol level causes them to pass out. Tragedies happen every day due to alcohol. Think twice before you drink, and never drive after drinking.

Betty and Bev

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Helping Your Heart and Your Memory

Resveratrol: Its Beneficial Effects

Would you like to make a simple healthful change to benefit your heart? Resveratrol elevates HDL levels, the good cholesterol. Having a high HDL doesn’t mean you are protected against developing heart disease, but those with high HDLs appear to have reduced risk for coronary artery disease. Two human studies have also shown resveratrol can boost insulin activity in Type II diabetics and reduce harmful blood vessel disease leading to diabetic blindness. Another effect is the reduction in fat cell production of inflammatory compounds that contribute to heart disease and tissue damage associated with diabetes.

This natural product, obtainable in most pharmacies and health food stores, stimulates a family of sirtuin proteins in the body that are gene regulators. Metabolic and biological aging processes are affected by sirtuins, especially the protein SIRT1. Researchers at Howard Hughes Medical Institute found SIRT1 plays a roll in decreasing aging and aids learning and memory. Most of us could benefit from that!

Another protein resveratrol stimulates is CREB, which  strengthens connections between neurons. The CREB activity is increased by SIRT1.  There won’t be an SIRT1 pill coming soon, but understanding this relationship shows promise in understanding and reversing degenerative processes causing memory loss. Resveratrol in your diet may help your memory.

Diets rich in resveratrol protect the heart, increase fat burning and reduce weight gain—and in mice, extend lifespan. The compound is found in grapes, grape products, wine, peanuts and some plants. A trade product containing resveratrol called Reversitol comes in both pill and liquid forms. It tastes like grape juice and is easily tolerated as a food supplement.

Betty Kuffel, MD