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Betty Kuffel, MD FACP An honors graduate of the University of Washington School of Medicine, Internal Medicine physician and former nurse practitioner, Dr. Kuffel has broad healthcare experience. After years of directing and working in emergency departments, and directing hospitalist inpatient care, recently Dr. Kuffel retired to pursue many interests including writing this blog for women. Because of a shared desire to help women of all ages achieve healthy fulfilled lives, she joined with her sister Bev Erickson and founded Lipstick Logic ™ to bring health and lifestyle education to women. Their contributions to educating women include hosting and speaking at women’s conferences, writing a health blog on LipstickLogic.com and writing a monthly health column for Montana Woman Magazine. Dr Kuffel has been recognized for her commitment to helping others. The Lipstick Logic concept evolved over years of caring for women in crisis. Dr. Kuffel believes education is the key to living healthier and making informed choices. Heart disease is the focus their collaborative book, Your Heart: Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease. Coronary artery disease is the number one cause of death and it is preventable. See: YourHeartBook.com

Travel Checklist

Before pilots leave the ground, they use detailed checklists to be sure the airplane is ready to fly. Are the engine gauges accurate? Is the fuel tank full? Like a pilot, do you have a personal checklist to assure you’re traveling safely, with the information and supplies required for the duration of time you’re away from home? Don’t run out of fuel before you touchdown back home.

I have cared for many people in emergency rooms who didn’t plan ahead. They left blood pressure and heart medications at home. They ran out of narcotic medications that doctors who don’t know them are unlikely to prescribe. Some even ran out of insulin or forgot asthma inhalers. Managing chronic health problems when you’re away from home is an important aspect of travel that requires planning.

If you are traveling across international borders, you must have your medications in pharmacy bottles labeled with your name. Ideally, whether you are traveling or just running to the grocery store, you carry a list of your medical problems, your physician’s name and phone number, a list of surgical procedures you’ve had, and a list of medications and dosages you take daily. When you fly or even travel by rail, your medications and important health information must be in a carry-on bag or on your person, not checked into baggage. If your luggage is lost or delayed, you are separated from important medications that impact your health and destroy your travel plans.

People with chronic pain problems requiring narcotic medication to suppress the symptoms are in a world of hurt without medications, especially if withdrawal occurs. Addiction to legally obtained medications is common. You likely are addicted if you take them daily throughout the day and will therefore, experience uncomfortable effects if you run out. There are many commonly used addictive drugs, both narcotics and sedatives, including sleeping pills. The market for these medications on the street is huge. Don’t risk having yours stolen.

If you leave these medications in your hotel room, even locked in a safe provided at the hotel, they are no safer than other belongings or jewelry. Hotel workers have keys to your room and your safe. Leave your jewelry at home. Carry your medication on your person.

Try to stay healthy. Only eat fruit you peel. Don’t eat food from street vendors.  Cold viruses can survive for days on surfaces such as an airline tray. Highly contagious Norovirus can survive up to a month, so what you touch and what you eat could ruin your day and your trip.

Germicidal hand wipes and lotions help purify surfaces and decrease your risks. Bring a clean pillow case to place between you and a pillow shared with other flight passengers. Sitting adjacent to a coughing, wheezing passenger could make you sick. Some people carry masks to wear if this happens. Some take Airborne, a popular herbal and vitamin product, believing it helps prevent colds. The company was sued and paid millions in a class-action suit for false advertising. Airborne does not prevent colds.

Sitting for long periods while driving, flying or even at home, places you at risk for a pulmonary embolism (PE), a problem far more serious than the flu and common cold; it can be fatal. PE results from stagnant venous blood flow in the legs, leading to blood clots that break loose and travel to heart and into the lung.

The clots often develop in the legs or groin. You are at higher risk if you have suffered a leg injury, your leg is casted or you’ve recently had pelvic surgery, such as a hysterectomy. Check with your doctor before taking a long trip. Consider wearing elastic compression stockings to wear while traveling. Do not wear short tight socks or cross your legs. If you are traveling by car, get out and walk every hour. Between connecting flights, walk. Exercise your legs while sitting. Flexing muscles helps move venous blood back to the heart. Pumping your feet up and down, and moving your legs while sitting, reduces blood clot risk. While seated, increase your circulation by using your feet to write letters of the alphabet. Do some exercise at least once an hour. Drink extra water to avoid dehydration. On long flights, get up and move around.

A few weeks before you travel, make your personal check list.

Example:

Carry on your person:

ID, credit cards, passport (if needed), insurance information

Make copies of above items and store in separate location

Cash, keep it out of sight

Medication supply for entire trip; list with dosages

Medical information and a copy of your ECG if you have heart problems

Cell phone with charger

List of important phone numbers in case cell phone or coverage is lost

Camera with extra digital storage, a charger or extra batteries

Bottled water

Extra contact lenses or glasses, sunglasses

Small first aid kit

If traveling outside the US: Consider travel and transport insurance. Have addresses and phone numbers of embassies and consulates in the areas you plan to visit.

Happy Travels.

www.usembassy.gov

Written by: Betty Kuffel, MD

Edited by: Bev Erickson

Lipstick Logic

Travel Tips

Leaving On Vacation

Sometimes we take cleanliness for granted in the United States. In spite of coming in contact with contaminated surfaces, we remain healthy. Yet we all know door knobs, shopping carts, computer keyboards, remote controls, telephones and even magazines in a waiting room, have been touched by many hands, contaminated hands. Touching any of these items and then rubbing your eye or licking a finger to turn a page can transfer enough organisms to make you ill.

Foodborne disease is common and occurs after consuming contaminated foods and drinks. Some foods contain toxins and chemicals that can also make you ill. In 2009 there were a number of foodborne disease outbreaks in Montana including bacterial diarrhea caused by Salmonella and E coli 0157:H7, and Norovirus. Some occurrences were in long-term-care facilities, but many were in community settings. Proper food- handling and hand-washing can prevent bacterial and viral transfer.

Consider the following surfaces that transfer germs that could ruin travel plans:

  • Fruit – eat only fruit you peel yourself. Skip the lemon wedge on a drink.
  • Salad bars – avoid them! Many hands contaminate serving utensils. Improperly refrigerated items or food warmed for long periods encourages bacterial growth.
  • Menus and ketchup bottles – wash your hands after touching them and don’t let them touch your plate or utensils.
  • Soap dispensers and bathroom faucets – use a paper towel when you touch them.
  • Airliner and other bathrooms – cover seats with a barrier. Use a towel to open all bathroom doors as they tend to be highly contaminated.
  • Doors – use a towel or clothing (like a sleeve) to open all doors.
  • Drinking water – most US water is safe, but when traveling outside the country, drink only from commercially sealed water or drink containers. Do Not Use Ice in your drinks as it is often contaminated, too.

By thoroughly washing your hands, using lots of soap and water, you can avoid the highly contagious Norovirus stomach flu (the kind that sweeps through cruise ships). Do the same for your children. Remain clear of people who are ill with vomiting and diarrhea. Clean surfaces with soapy water and bleach.

Potlucks and buffets are often sources of foodborne illness. Using utmost care when preparing food for large gatherings and keeping foods properly refrigerated will go a long way toward keeping yourself, your family and friends healthy this summer.

For added protection, carry antibacterial wipes and alcohol-based lotion to purify your hands, when soap and water are not available.

Betty Kuffel MD

Lipstick Logic

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LIPSTICK LOGIC HAS JUST LAUNCHED A NEW WEBSITE AND BLOG WHERE WE WILL POST UP-TO-DATE HEALTH INFORMATION ON VARIED TOPICS.  LipstickLogic.com

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Requests for more information on health issues of interest are encouraged. You can even “Ask Dr. Betty” if you have a specific  question.

Summer Sun – Benefits, Dangers & Preventions

Image1.  Sun Benefits: Smiles and Vitamin D

Invigorating sunshine can scatter the winter blues and put a smile on your face. When ultraviolet sun rays strike and warm your skin they trigger Vitamin D synthesis. Residents in northern climate are often Vitamin D deficient. We miss the beneficial sun effect because much of the year we are bundled in clothing. To maximize your absorption of Vitamin D from the sun, you may want to soak up a few rays before applying your daily sunscreen. Vitamin D is necessary for the body to absorb dietary calcium, essential for strong bones, teeth and more. Very few foods are rich in Vitamin D, so dietary supplements may be necessary to maintain a healthy Vitamin D level. All Vitamin D forms, including those from the sun, food and supplements are inactive. The liver and kidneys convert the inactive forms into active calcitriol molecules capable of being absorbed by the body.

Inadequate Vitamin D impacts many complex cellular processes including:

  • Bone structure and weakness due to calcium deficiency
  • Cell growth, immune and neuromuscular function, and reduced inflammatory response

A simple blood test can determine an individuals’ level of Vitamin D and supplements can be prescribed to offset a deficiency.

2.  Sun Dangers: Skin & Eye Damage and Skin Cancer

The two ultraviolet radiation spectrums of concern are UVA (320-400nm) and UVB (290-320). UVA is known to penetrate deeper into the skin and is the primary cause of skin wrinkling, non-melanoma skin cancers and possibly melanoma. It is not blocked by automobile or window glass and does not result in sunburn – 95% of sunlight reaching the earth is UVA. UVB is known to be the major factor in tanning and sunburn.

In addition to skin damage, the sun rays can damage both the lens and cornea of the eyes. Clouding in the lens indicates a cataract formation and reduces vision. A feared disease of the retina, the macula, is responsible for sharp visual focus. When the macula deteriorates, acute vision required for reading, is impaired. Macular degeneration often runs in families but UV radiation has also been linked to this disorder. Vitamin supplements may be helpful in prevention. There are some treatments available, but they are not always successful in preventing vision loss.

3.  Sun Risk Preventions:

  • Protect yourself and your children against UVB by wearing sunscreen. SPF stands for Sun Protection Factor. An SPF 15, for example will provide about an hour of protection before it is necessary to reapply sunscreen. This varies from person to person, however, so be watchful and read product directions carefully.
  • Protect your skin against UVA burning, by wearing a protective hat, and clothing.
  • Always avoid prolonged sun exposure to decrease risk for collagen destruction resulting in early skin aging and dramatic increased risk for melanoma.
  • Protect your eyes by always wearing sunglasses. Children also need to wear them. Dogs, too, develop UV eye damage. Doggie goggles are available at www.goggles.com

Enjoy the sun, but in moderation.

Betty Kuffel, MD

A Logical Approach To Health

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